Seven Things Every Scholarly Publisher Should Know about Researchers — The Scholarly Kitchen

What should publishers know about researchers and their work? Alice Meadows and Karin Wulf follow up a post earlier this year about “Seven Things Every Researcher Should Know about Scholarly Publishing.”

via Seven Things Every Scholarly Publisher Should Know about Researchers — The Scholarly Kitchen

How to write a discussion chapter?

Discussion Chapter Burger
The discussion chapter burger

It never ceases to amaze me how often students underestimate the importance of a good, solid discussion/conclusion chapter. As part of your dissertation or PhD the final chapter is worth its weight in gold, it brings together all the disparate elements of your thesis, allowing the researcher to finish with a flourish!

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What is sampling?

Sampling approaches
Finding your sample

This blog post attempts to answer one of the fundamental questions of any research project, and one that confuses many a researcher, what is sampling? Why is it important for this research study? First let us be clear the first step within the realm of any social enquiry includes making decisions, which allows for the design and selection of a research sample that matches the focus of this study.

If you are more interested in finding out how many people you should interview, then click here, otherwise continue reading.

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Learning, Teaching & Student Experience 2016

Entrance to Aston University
CABS conference at Aston University

Recently I attended the Chartered Association of Business Schools (CABS) latest conference on the Learning, Teaching & Student Experience. I managed to get the chance to listen to some excellent keynotes on creativity, passion and learning styles, alongside some thought provoking sessions on student epistemologies, blended learning and the flipped classroom. The conference also gave me the chance to deliver my latest paper, which talks about academic Marginalisation and increasing Marketisation of higher education. This was all underpinned by a very supportive twitter back channel #LTSE2016.

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Using Template analysis

Fork in the Road
Which road to take?

Finding an analytical mechanism that can be employed to analyse Qualitative research is a road filled with laughter, tears, pain and in some cases misery. With so many differing approaches to choose from it can be a difficult decision to decide on what you feel is a suitable mechanism to help you analyse those interviews, documents and memos, which you have so meticulously collected over the lifetime of your research. Hence today I want to talk about what is a relatively new method of Qualitative Data Analysis called Template analysis (I say new but it is about 15 years old, so still a teenager!). I will discuss this as a viable alternative to IPA (Interpretative Phenomenological analysis).

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thirteen reasons researchers get asked to write their methods chapter again

Some good advice here. New researchers especially can lose focus.

patter

Dissertation examiners always check the methods chapter or methodological writings carefully. And the more the doctorate is seen as research training, the more important it will be for examiners to make sure that the relevant writings in the thesis really do indicate that the researcher can do the technical stuff properly. So here’s my list of what I look for in methods chapters and/or methodological writings, and what I’ve seen other examiners look for. To know the worst is to be better prepared. Well, that’s the goal.

1. The researcher does not know the difference between methodology and methods.

2. The researcher has written a long essay about epistemology and ontology. They have named their own stance but have failed to develop what it means for their subsequent choices of methodology and research design.

3. The methodology does not fit with the theoretical framework and/or the research tradition of…

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Memoing and Data collection

Note taking
Taking notes when conducting interviews

The collection of data is often a complex affair which really tests the mettle of any budding researcher. There are various mechanisms which help the researcher in collecting data in a comprehensive and logical manner. One of the most popular methods of data collection within a qualitative environment is the Interview. However many qualitative researchers would argue that this is not enough, to much data gets lost!

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Types of interviews for data collection

Interview in Progress
Key to a good interview

In this blog post I want to take some time looking at the different types of interviews for collecting data. Every qualitative researcher will at one time or another need to conduct research where they need to interview their research participant(s).  In the view of the research (Burnard, Gill, Stewart, Treasure, & Chadwick, 2008; Gill, Stewart, Treasure, & Chadwick, 2008; Morse & Corbin, 2003) there are three fundamental types of research interviews, these are:

  • Structured,
  • Semi-structured
  • Unstructured

Each of these have a slight variation in their structure and more importantly conduct. Morse & Corbin (2003) discus this in more detail and note that the main difference between the three approaches is “The degree to which participants have control over the process and content of the interview”.

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Academic SEO: The future of research citations

Academic SEo
Using SEO principles to increase research citations

As academics we spend countless hours, days and weeks developing papers which we hope will one day make a difference in the world. One metric that is often used to measure this difference is article citations. The more citations a paper can gather the higher the impact this can have on the career of an academic. However for many academics once they submit their paper and it has been has accepted for publishing they sit on their laurels and expect citations to come rolling in.

In the brave new world of the internet this is no longer the case. With so much data and information out there, getting your paper seen is becoming increasingly difficult. Academics need to understand that they are competing for citations in a global marketplace, the competition is fierce. Hence this blog post looks at the process of Academic SEO, which is the application of marketing principles to rank your research higher in the popular search engines (Google, Yahoo, Bing), and hence increasing the chances of your research being found and cited.

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